Stakholders SGV issues Position Paper on “Support Teacher Housing”

Tree removal & mitigation, tennis court damages, as of 09 Feb 2018  

From: Stakeholders for a Safe Green Village <Contact@StakeholdersSGV.org>
Subject: Willow Street-Bramhall Park; tree removal & mitigation, tennis court damages Date: February 9, 2018

To: Parks, Recreation, & Neighborhood Services (PRNS), City of San Jose

On Wednesday 07 February 2018, some issues advanced when the city came out to Willow Street-Bramhall Park to remove a tree in front of the tennis court. This particular tree that was removed is in front of the tennis court, on Willow Street, near the walkway and gate to the tennis court at the Glen Echo, also near the Bocce Ball court.

As maybe you already know, the workers cut down the tree at about 3:30 PM, when it then fell on the fence that encloses the tennis courts. Now two or three of the vertical poles on the fence needs to be repaired, as well as its upper horizontal bar. This section of the fencing is now warped or out of shape.
People who regularly use the court already complain that the pavement is cracked in several areas, although I understand that the city is considering repaving the court in the near future if the budget schedules allow this. Unlike any other feature in the park, the tennis court is probably the most popular of the park’s amenities other than the children’s playground. It has constant use on a daily basis, and throughout the entire year, including holidays. It also has a regular following of users that have cared for the court for decades… quite literally. We actually recognize many of these people, because they are that regular, generational, and dedicated.
What is the schedule for repairing the fence? Beyond that, what’s the schedule for repairing the entire court itself, such as the pavement? You can see photographs of the damaged fence attached to this email, as well as in the attached link to Google Photos (shared online)
Now that this tree is removed, you will now notice that there are only four full-grown trees fronting Willow Street and the tennis court, where there was originally seven just two years ago. In addition to the photographs in this email, also see the attached photograph album at the Google Photos link here:
  • Bramhall-Willow Street Park Tree Mitigation,
    from 23
    July 2016 to 08 February 2018
    Location
    : Willow Street, from Glen Eyrie Avenue to Glen Echo
    (Aside the tennis courts, from north of Glen Eyrie gateway path, towards Glen Echo walkway, at Bocce Ball Bowl) See photograph album at Google Photos link here: https://photos.app.goo.gl/FRWf2W3GwmmnoZ7h2
Status as of 08 February 2018: One Red Oak tree towards the front of this attached picture has since fallen although its roots are still embedded in the ground. Behind that is another variety that has also fallen, although it is regenerating from its stump. Down the line, there are now only four trees remaining in front of the tennis courts at Willow Street; whereas, two years ago, there were originally seven trees here.
What’s attached here in this email is a small sample of what we have found all over the park, just over the last two years. In actuality, there are hundreds of trees in the park that are in need of attention. We would like to meet with you again to discuss the mitigation of trees and other landscaping in Willow Street-Bramhall Park. It is my understanding that the new Concession Building is scheduled to be completed and opened as of this summer, while the improved Bowling Green is already in use. While there are other improvements required in the park, we would like to discuss how best to prioritize the various options on the budget schedule, as well as how to best improve the ecology of the park. Many trees are showing signs of sickness, well beyond the ones fronting the tennis court on Willow Street. How can we begin to address this problem, and what are our options?
We also think it’s time to start creating a plan for the environmental conservation and green print, beyond the structural and built improvements, use contracts, and so on. Here’s an idea of the kind of discussion that needs to take place:
  • How can we reverse the environmental degradation?
  • How can we regenerate the arboriculture (trees) and other vegetation?
  • How will we choose the preferred greenery? Can we replace them with new, healthier, and stronger varieties?
  • What is the rate of sick and dying trees in need of mitigation? How soon can these trees be replaced, and how long will new trees and plants take to mature?
  • Can we increase the greenery? And how can we maximize those plantings for the best outcome?
  • Can we have trees donated? What’s the best process for this? And how will they be planted, and maintained?

Position Paper in favor of “Support Teacher Housing”

Stakeholders for a Safe Green Village

Position Paper

On Support Teacher Housing

Monday 31 July 2017

 

San Jose, the nation’s tenth largest city, is known as the “Capital of Silicon Valley” and even “America’s richest city”  In this region of technological expertise and innovation, it’s education, research, and development that drives smart growth.

But, not everyone easily benefits from the vast wealth, know-how, and the opportunities that are available here.  That’s especially if they’re not directly part of the tech sector economy.

How unaffordable has San Jose and the Silicon Valley region become FOR the rest of the population, and the area’s supporting economies?

According to a popularly cited study by the  Demographia International Housing Affordability Survey, ”San Jose is the most ‘unaffordable major city” in the U.S. & one of most unaffordable in the entire world – only behind Hong Kong, Sydney, Vancouver, & Auckland.”

There’s an ongoing challenge to our core municipal services, as well as the fundamental needs of our least wealthy citizens.  Added to this dilemma, we are seeing an increasingly divided and unequal city.  Education and teachers are now at the heart of that.

Teacher salaries in San Jose, Silicon Valley, and the San Francisco Bay Area region are not compensating for the general cost of living, and they are part of a less competitive sector of the economy that’s not commercially based like the rest of the region’s job market.  The very teachers that guide us on the path to higher education, the higher skilled jobs, and the highest paying salaries are the ones that cannot afford to live in Silicon Valley themselves — independently.

Retaining a diverse teacher’s Workforce that can afford to live here…

is one way that we can help close the academic achievement gap and ensure sustainable development for our community This helps develop the general population in our region and boost its collaboration, creativity, and global competition.  This sustains our economy and workforce without having to expend ourselves with substantial labor import and turnover.

When the people that live here are the same people that are teaching here, educated here, and working here, that’s how we develop a civic culture that’s well rooted, world class, and an example of pride and leadership.  Our citizens develop a profound sense of care and understanding of the community when the personal investment made in their education is realized in their daily lives.  This way, the Capital of Silicon Valley truly embodies the application of learning and innovation.

In both public or private schools, even if we attract and recruit talent, we must retain it

Whether we choose private or public schools, it’s the cost of land development; the building of new schools; and the quality of that education (in of itself) that are all becoming greater challenges.

The California Teacher’s Association notes that “California is already ranked dead last (50th) in student-to-teacher ratios, and would need 100,000 additional teachers right now just to bring that ratio to the national average.

Opportunities to create strong neighborhoods with good schools — plus exceptional teachers and student bodies— varies between the city’s districts.  Commuting to the best schools across (or out of town) is not feasible for everyone. We need “missing middle housing” nearby our schools, where teachers work, and where they are close to the “main street” areas.  The project by Support Teacher Housing maintains the San Jose Metropolitan area’s status relative to the other major cities in our region, the state, and the nation.

This is a replicable model, niched right in the neighborhood itself, and servicing its connected area…

This is a more appropriate model for San Jose (and the county) because of our city’s far reaching geography, its ever growing population, and its numerously diverse neighborhoods.

San Jose’s neighborhoods and districts are competing with each other; as well as with the other cities in our metropolitan area and region.  Notwithstanding, we’re responsible for the equal and balanced development of our neighborhoods, as much as for our upcoming youth, and our aging population.

According to the The National Education Association (NEA), there are four main factors affecting teacher recruitment over the next decade:

(1) a shrinking teaching force; (2) a growing student population; (3) lack of diversity among teachers to match the diversity of students; (4) a need for teachers in specific types of schools, geographic locations, and subject areas. [see here]

Nationally, it’s estimated that half of our teachers will either retire or leave in the next five to seven years, and the turnover factor is greater among newcomers. The numbers are worse in urban areas. [ibidem]

It’s more than a question of how many teachers will leave, versus staying local in San Jose’s neighborhoods and the metropolitan area.  It’s more of a growing realization that many of teachers are leaving the state of California, altogether.

Hypothetically, if a teacher’s average salary is near $70,000 in San Jose, then the take-home pay after taxes is a mere $50,000 by most estimates.  (Indeed, some estimates are lower: $45,000 to 57,000 salaries!)) Where is the incentive and dignity of work in that?  Where’s the incentive to stay in San Jose, aside from the feasibility?  Even if two teachers joined together, they still wouldn’t be able to buy a home in San Jose, because the median 20% down-payment is $192,320.  To add some perspective, “that’s median nationwide value of an entire house: $192,500.”  There’s less choice, diversity, and empowerment in that when a teacher would need to partner with someone who earns nearly double their own salary (or more), just to be able to buy a home here and to make the best of their life’s plan. [Mercury News, Jan. 16, 2017].

“Only 1% of housing built since 2015 is for the Missing Middle…

(ie. moderate-income households) in the Silicon Valley.”, as pointed out in Sarah’s presentation at the Willow Glen Neighborhood Association – WGNA Board Meeting on 13 April 2017.  Plus, “88% of Silicon Valley’s residential units permitted thus far in the 2015-2023 RHNA cycle were in the Above Moderate (120%+ of the Area Median Income) category.” [Source: Association of Bay Area Government (ABAG). Analysis: Silicon Valley Institute for Regional Studies. Regional Housing Need Allocation (RHNA)]

Unlike other proposals, Sarah’s model is genuineMissing Middle” housing.  It gives teachers the need help to afford living here, approximate to where people choose to work, live, and relax. Complete and livable communities provide us the “work-life balance of living free of the burdensome expense of long and difficult commutes; making for a decreased carbon footprint in the urban region; and, liberating us for social and participatory activities in the neighborhoods where we live.  This is the desire of the younger Millennial Generation, as much as it falls into the aging in place mindset.  In today’s world, as people age, couple-up, start families, and make lifetime plans, etc., they can use a bolster or jump-start to get on the right track towards sustaining themselvesIt’s the circle of life, as we press on to invest and capitalize on the community, and even care for aging parents, etc.

The cause for Support Teacher Housing meets San Jose’s long-term goals for the Envision 2040 general plan, & Economic Development…

In view of the salaries that are less competitive and market-driven —especially here in Silicon Valley — this fulfills a regenerative need.  This plan is a replicable and sustainable teacher housing model that benefits San Jose’s core municipal services, and it’s on privately owned land without expense to taxpayers and government funds.  This is innovative social entrepreneurship at work with green, high-quality, low-cost technology.

To the contrary, this is not a “zero-sum game”.  San Jose and Santa Clara County should no longer be building in the traditional mindset of urban versus suburban communities, no more than it should be placing the housing market against retail, or the commercial and jobs market.  This project recognizes the necessity for each of our neighborhoods to become dynamic, mixed, complete, and self-sustainable.  It builds harmony.

The region is moving towards the New Urbanism” paradigm.  Lincoln Avenue is the very axis on which the urban village and the main street commercial district is balanced.

The city has already allowed new mid-rise buildings on Lincoln Avenue and the surrounding area, in addition to other land use exceptions that are made for the public good.  Likewise, the City of San Jose can benefit its residents by doing the same for a small, private developers who are proposing a comparatively modest project for teachers and, possibly, entry-level government employees.

After all, this parcel — with its size, and its location — is more conducive to Sarah’s plan for a mixed-use, multi-modal, complete and livable design.  This is more feasible than a forced and unconventional retail concept, which really has no guarantee of success and profitability, especially given the realities of the parcel, and this part of Lincoln Avenue’s surrounding strip.

What’s the sense of advocating for business and retail development in a community, if the very people that service the residents and the main economy cannot afford to buy, aside from meet their own basic needs?  This is not just an unsustainable trend for teachers and the people that provide us our community’s supporting services.  It’s also a problem for the people that rely on this labor, and these services, in order to maintain greater economic development.

Stakeholders for a Safe Green Village supports Sarah Chaffin’s plan for affordable teacher housing at 2119 Lincoln Avenue…

assessor’s parcel #439-08-059, and San Jose General Plan project file #GP17-005. We urge Mayor Liccardo and the City Council to approve this project as it progressed with the San Jose Planning Commission’s recommendation and support.

Best,

David J. Zappelli

Chairperson,

Stakeholders for a Safe Green Village (SGV)


PDF formatted document: Stakeholders SGV Position Paper on “Support Teacher Housing” (Monday 31 July 2017)


Send us your feedback in the attached contact form in the below:

TODAY, WEDNESDAY 24 MAY, SUPPORT TEACHER HOUSING AT CITY HALL

Teacher HousingToday the San Jose Planning Commission will decide whether to approve or deny our teacher housing project.

Thank you for offering to include your voice in our coalition of teachers, parents and local families that are standing up for our teachers.
We’ll be at San Jose City Council Chambers, 200 East Santa Clara Street from 6:00PM.
The Commission meeting starts at 6:30PM sharp, and we are first on the agenda so please get there as early as possible.
Remember to wear pink! So all the commissioners know we’re coming!
We will have talking points available at the hearing for anyone who needs a helping hand with their comments.
If you have any questions feel free to call, text or email.
See you tonight!
Israel Molina
Organizer
Support Teacher Housing

#WillowGlen#LincolnAvenueSJ#TeacherHousing#SanJose#Education

 


DESCRIPTION

Support Teacher Housing is an organization working to build affordable, teacher housing. Our mission is to help teachers live where they work, help schools recruit and retain teachers, and create a model that other towns and cities can replicate.

HOWEVER, the San Jose City Planning Commission intends to vote against our project at the Planning Commission Hearing on Wednesday, May 24.

Parents, teachers, and community members overwhelmingly support this project. We must make it clear to the Planning Commission that affordable, teacher housing is good for San Jose and good for the Bay Area – we need your help to drive this point home.

Join us at the Planning Commission Hearing on May 24th and show your support for teacher housing.


DATE AND TIME

Wed, May 24, 2017

6:30 PM – 8:30 PM PDT

Add to Calendar

LOCATION

City Council Chambers

200 East Santa Clara Street

San Jose, CA 95113

View Map


EVENTBRITE.com: 
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/show-your-support-for-affordable-teacher-housing-tickets-34636452562?utm_campaign=new_event_email&utm_medium=email&utm_source=eb_email&utm_term=viewmyevent_button

Willow Street-Frank Bramhall Park: budget approval for the bowling green renovation project goes before City Hall on Tuesday 13 December 2016

Renovation of the lawn bowling green at Willow Street-Frank Bramhall Park has been given to Goodland Landscape Construction and its contract proposal shall come before the San Jose City Council for a vote of approval on Tuesday 13 December 2016.

See item 2.39 of the City of San José City Council Meeting Agenda, “Report on Bids and Award of a Construction Contract for the 7267 – Bramhall Park Lawn Bowling Green Renovation Project”.

(a) Report on bids and award of a construction contract for 7267 – Bramhall Park Lawn Bowling Green Renovation project to the low bidder, Goodland Landscape Construction, Inc. for the base bid in the total amount of $1,104,350 and approval of a five percent contingency in the amount of $55,218; and
(b) Adopt the following 2016-2017 Appropriation Ordinance Amendments in the Subdivision Park Trust Fund:
(1) Increase the Bramhall Park Lawn Bowling project to the Parks, Recreation and Neighborhood Services Department by $455,000; and
(2) Decrease the Future PDO/PIO Project Reserves by $455,000.
CEQA:  Exempt, Section 15301 Existing Facilities, File No. PP15-065.  Council District 6.  (Public Works/Parks, Recreation and Neighborhood Services/City Manager)

It was back on 10 November 2016 that Dave Mitchell made a presentation at the board meeting of Willow Glen Neighborhood Association (WGNA), responding to park issues.   Mitchell is the Planner/Project Manager for Frank Bramhall-Willow Street Park at the Department of Parks, Recreation & Neighborhood Services of the City of San Jose.

Mitchell stated that the cost for the renovated bowling green will now be  “$1,104,350 + $110,435 + $410,215 = $1,625,000”.  That’s almost double its initial estimate, and subject to approval from city council on the 13th December.

While the Lawn Bowling Green Renovation remained in waiting from August to this Tuesday 13 December 2016, money originally scheduled in the budget for the bowling green had been traded to the new concession building project, therein increasing the original cost of the concession.

In the original information shared with Stakeholders SGV and WGNA, it was stated by PRNS in the mini-plan set and budget schedule of the Bramhall Park Lawn Bowling Green Renovation project that the initial cost would be $850,000.  See here on pages 64 to 73 of the Stakeholders SGV presentation (July 2016) for earlier details.

If the decision is passed at City Hall on Tuesday 13 December 2016, the budget for the Lawn Bowling Green Renovation will be increased by $775,000.  That’s just $75,000 short of doubling the original cost (estimated at $850,000).

The city has proposed going forward with a Lawn Bowling Green Renovation project after the new concession building is finished in the park.  Construction of the new Restroom, Concession & Storage Building Project started breaking ground on Columbus Day (Monday, October 10, 2016).  Mayor Liccardo and San Jose City Councilmembers voted in favor of Agenda Item 5.1: “Report on Bids and Award of Contract for the 7855 – Bramhall RestroomConcession-Storage Building Project” at the San Jose City Council Meeting for August 9, 2016.
It was stated by PRNS in the mini-plan set and budget schedule of the Bramhall Park Restroom and Concession Building project that its initial cost would be $1,200,000 (see the presentation here on pages 38 to 54).  But, as of 10 November 2016, Dave Mitchell stated in his presentation to WGNA that the revised cost of the new concession building will now be “$1,116,524 + $111,652 + $415,824 = $1,644,000”.

So, the total cost of all current projects and renovations in Willow Street-Frank Bramhall Park for the year of 2016 — which includes the bowling green and concession building improvements — will be for a revised total of approximately $3,269,000.  ($1,625,000 + $1,644,000 = $3,269,000)

Looking back through July and August 2016, the initial estimate was $1.2 million for the concession, plus $850,000 for the bowling green, which means that the total of cost of the two projects, as originally planned, was $2,050,000, as stated back in July 2016.

Notwithstanding, in the earlier planning dates, an estimated amount was not stated for the requested repairs that have since been made on the roof of the old field house, which is situated at Willow Street at Glen Brook Avenue.  The old field house was built in the 1950s and is located approximately 550 feet from the new concession building that’s currently underway near the amphitheater, situated at Willow Street and Glen Eyrie Avenue.

At the WGNA board meeting on Thursday 10 November 2016, Dave Mitchell stated that the new roof to the older existing building will cost $30,000, contracted to California Roofing Company.   That job was completed in mid-November 2016 (about a month ago).

Adding this roof to the total cost of improvements, as originally planned, it then amounts to $2,080,000.  ($1.2 million + $850,000 + $30,000 = $2,080,000)

As of December 13th, increases to the runing costs will include $1,625,000 + $1,644,000 + $30,000, which brings the total amount to $3,299,000.

So, overall, when the mayor and city council vote, the running costs are expected to be about $1,249,000 over the original plans and estimates.   ($3,299,000 –  $2,050,000 = $1,249,000).  

 

dave-mitchell-sj-prns-11-10-16-presentation-wgna-meeting-2-1
Excerpt from Dave Mitchell’s presentation to WGNA
dave-mitchell-sj-prns-11-10-16-presentation-wgna-meeting-2-2
Excerpt from Dave Mitchell’s presentation to WGNA


Related: memorandum-wsp-bowling-green

Old Field House at Willow Street-Frank Bramhall Park finally gets a new roof

As of Monday 15 November 2016, repairs on the roof of the old field house finally began.  At the board meeting of Willow Glen Neighborhood Association on Thursday 10 November 2016, Dave Mitchell, park planner for San Jose Parks, Recreation, & Neighborhood Services (PRNS) made a presentation and stated that the new roof to the existing building will cost $30,000, contracted to California Roofing Company.

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The old field house was built circa 1954 with 2,800 sq ft of combined space for a service office, storage room, park office, restrooms, and a mechanical room.  It is situated at Willow Street and Glen Brook Avenue.

As of May and July 2016, Stakeholders for a Safe Green Village started advocating on issues in the park, therein asking about the poor conditions of the field house.  We supported the idea, along with many of the park area residents, that the city should maintain current facilities before it begins new projects.  On 15 July 2016, Dave Mitchell of PRNS stated “The roof on the existing building as you stated is in poor shape. Staff is aware of the roof condition. A work order is in the process of being submitted the Public Works Department to replace the roof during this fiscal year, which ends on June 30, 2017.”

Stakeholders SGV addressed the condition of the field house in a presentation to Willow Glen Neighborhood Association on Thursday 28 July 2016.  See pages 28 through 33 of the presentation here on the StakeholdersSGV.org website.

As of Thursday 17 November 2016, more than half of the new shingles had been placed atop the roof by late afternoon.   Look for another update by the weekend.

Construction begins on the new Willow Street-Bramhall Park Restroom, Concession & Storage Building Project

Planned structural changes are now underway in Willow Street-Frank Bramhall  Park, as seen during early October to November 2016 .  Construction of the new Restroom, Concession & Storage Building Project started breaking ground on Columbus Day (Monday, October 10, 2016).

Mayor Liccardo and San Jose City Councilmembers voted in favor of Agenda Item 5.1: “Report on Bids and Award of Contract for the 7855 – Bramhall RestroomConcession-Storage Building Project” at the San Jose City Council Meeting for August 9, 2016.

Stakeholders for a Safe Green Village (SGV) had known of no public outreach or notification to area residents, especially those adjacent and nearby the park itself, even prior to the City Hall decision.  

Stakeholders SGV started taking significant note of issues in the park as of May and June 2016,  addressing the related topics in partnership with Willow Glen Neighborhood Association (WGNA) as of June and July.  The two organizations have written position papers and emails to the San Jose department of Parks, Recreation, & Neighborhood Services (PRNS), city officials, electoral candidates, and other neighborhood leaders.  (See here).

Construction of the new concession is expected to be finished sometime by winter 2017 (possibly January or February 2017 by soft estimates).

On Thursday 10 November 2016, at the board meeting of Willow Glen Neighborhood Association (WGNA), Dave Mitchell made a presentation in response to park issues.   He is the Planner/Project Manager for Frank Bramhall-Willow Street Park at the Department of Parks, Recreation & Neighborhood Services of the City of San Jose.

In the original information shared with Stakeholders SGV and WGNA, it was stated by PRNS in the mini-plan set and budget schedule of the Bramhall Park Restroom and Concession Building project that the initial cost would be $1,200,000.  See here on pages 38 to 54 of the Stakeholders SGV presentation (July 2016) for earlier details.

But, as of 10 November 2016, Dave Mitchell stated in his presentation to WGNA that the revised cost will now be “$1,116,524 + $111,652 + $415,824 = $1,644,000”.  The job was contracted and approved to Tucker Construction Construction on 09 August 2016.

[Editor’s note: this article was originally drafted on October 11, and posted on November 11.  It has since been updated, revised and re-posted.  The last revision was made on 17 November 2016].

Update & Presentation: Willow Street-Bramhall Park Projects; changes to budget & schedule for the year 2016

On Thursday 10 November 2016, at the board meeting of Willow Glen Neighborhood Association (WGNA), Dave Mitchell made a presentation in response to park issues.   He is the Planner/Project Manager for Frank Bramhall-Willow Street Park at the Department of Parks, Recreation & Neighborhood Services of the City of San Jose.

In the original information shared with Stakeholders SGV and WGNA, it was stated by PRNS in the mini-plan set and budget schedule of the Bramhall Park Restroom and Concession Building project that the initial cost would be $1,200,000.  See here on pages 38 to 54 of the Stakeholders SGV presentation (July 2016) for earlier details.

But, as of 10 November 2016, Dave Mitchell stated in his presentation to WGNA that the revised cost of the new concession building will now be “$1,116,524 + $111,652 + $415,824 = $1,644,000”.  The job was contracted and approved to Tucker Construction Construction on 09 August 2016.  It’s currently underway.

After the new concession building is finished, the city also intends to go forward with a Lawn Bowling Green Renovation project.    At that time of his last presentation on 10 November 2016, Mitchell stated that the scheduled and estimated cost of the Lawn Bowling Renovation had more than doubled.  Money originally scheduled in the budget for the bowling green had also been traded to the new concession building project (mentioned above), increasing its cost.

In the original information shared with Stakeholders SGV and WGNA, it was stated by PRNS in the mini-plan set and budget schedule of the Bramhall Park Lawn Bowling Green Renovation project that the initial cost would be $850,000.  See here on pages 64 to 73 of the Stakeholders SGV presentation (July 2016) for earlier details.

But, as of 10 November 2016, Dave Mitchell stated in his presentation to WGNA that the cost for the renovated bowling green will now be  “$1,104,350 + $110,435 + $410,215 = $1,625,000”.  That’s more than double its initial estimate, subject to approval from city council.  That’s if the extra funds are granted, therein replacing those funds in the initial budget that have since been traded to the new concession stand. The job for the lawn bowling green is contracted to Goodland Landscape Construction and shall come before the San Jose City Council for a vote of approval on 13 December 2016.

dave-mitchell-sj-prns-11-10-16-presentation-wgna-meeting-2-1
Excerpt from Dave Mitchell’s presentation to WGNA
dave-mitchell-sj-prns-11-10-16-presentation-wgna-meeting-2-2
Excerpt from Dave Mitchell’s presentation to WGNA

Meanwhile, Stakeholders SGV has also asked the city to restore the existing building, the old Field House at Willow Street and Glen Brook Avenue.  PRNS had first confirmed by email, as of 15 July 2016, that “The roof on the existing building as you stated is in poor shape. Staff is aware of the roof condition. A work order is in the process of being submitted the Public Works Department to replace the roof during this fiscal year, which ends on June 30, 2017.”  Stakeholders SGV pressed PRNS to make a firm commitment in those regards and make an early repair.

Dave Mitchell stated at the presentation that the new roof to the existing building will cost $30,000, contracted to California Roofing Company.

Overall, the total cost of all projects and renovations in Willow Street-Frank Bramhall Park, for the year of 2016, will be approximately 3 million dollars. 

Forum: San Jose District 6, Chapman v. Davis

Make your decision for City Council Member.  See Helen Chapman versus Dev Davis in a political forum at Starlite Banquet Hall at 680 Minnesota Avenue (near W. Alma Avenue, Lelong Street, & Guadalupe Highway 87).

The candidate forum starts at 7 p.m. on Wednesday 05 October 2016.  Meet Chapman and Davis before (6:30), or after (approximately 8:30).

The event is sponsored by Stakeholders for a Safe Green Village (SGV); Willow Glen Neighborhood Association (WGNA); United Neighborhoods of Santa Clara County (UNSCC); and District 6 Neighborhood Leaders (D6NL).

District 6 October Debate 2016 11x17

An inventory of trees in Willow Street-Frank Bramhall Park; the green initiative begins

Stakeholders for a Safe Green Village started taking note of the diseased and dead trees in Wilow Street-Frank Bramhall Park several months ago, even before the presentation on Thursday 28 June 2016.  Now, as of the start of August, we’re serious about taking an inventory of every tree in the park!

Currently, as of the first week, we’ve created a greenprint of the park, section by section, pointing out the trees by their varietals, location, and needs for mitigation.   At this time, most of the north side of the park is mapped and inventoried, excluding the amphitheatre and wooded creek area (opposite of the Willow Street-Britton Avenue pathway).

The initial assessment points out numerous diseased and dead trees, as well as several that are showing signs of dryness and browning.  The park has numerous red oaks that make up a significant share of those trees that are distressed or dead.   There are also several redwoods that could benefit from mitigation.

The inventory will help us create an overall assessment of the arboriculture in the park; the share and numeration of its varietals; the gravity of its mitigation; solutions and alternatives to the current condition and its trend; as well as the overall breadth and scope of the project.

Once an inventory is complete, we can start the mitigation process more effectively.  This includes a regular care program, as well as an initiative for replacement of those trees that are chronically diseased, and dead.

In the last meeting on 01 August 2016 (in the park), we discussed plans for the new concession stand, its footprint in the park, surrounding trees, etc.   We pointed out where one of the trees was recently removed and grounded down to wood chips, but without any explanation.

One of the everyday concerns is the management of the park’s topography, including the natural ground cover around many  of the old and distinguished trees.  Litter control is a primary issue for many people that live near the park, as well as those that visit and use the park regularly.  The waste often creates a toxic and invasive environment to the plant and wildlife, as much as it does to the people.  Broken irrigation systems and related grounds issues are also of concern.

See the attached clips from the June 28th presentation on the park.  This section of the slide presentation relates to the green initiative and arboriculture in Willow Street-Frank Bramhall Park.  A complete view of the presentation can be seen here.

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Follow-up Meeting: 01 Aug 2016 in Willow Street Park

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Join Stakeholders for a Safe Green Village and Willow Glen Neighborhood Association tonight, Monday 01 August 2016 at 7pm in the Britton Picnic Area of Willow Street Frank Bramhall Park for a follow-up meeting. Since the 28 July presentation, we’ll be continuing the discussion. Today’s meeting will primarily concern the structural changes in the amphitheater area and the new concession building which will include extra restrooms and storage. In part, our talk should involve contracts in the park by various stakeholders.

Please feel free to drop by and join us, as this should be a more casual get together and conversation.

Also follow our Facebook page at Stakeholders for Willow Street Park.

For the location of the Britton Picnic Area, see the Facebook post and album:
https://www.facebook.com/StakeholdersWSP/photos/a.1737806886432003.1073741834.1735385980007427/1737810029765022/?type=3&theater

Canvassing door to door: “Structural Changes at Willow Street-Frank Bramhall Park” (with WGNA)

UPCOMING MEETING:

Structural Changes at Willow Street-Frank Bramhall Park

Stakeholders for a Safe Green Village is currently going door to door and canvassing the neighborhood in regards to structural changes in Willow Street Bramall Park.  We are handing out the below informational flier.  To get more information, please click the menu tab atop this page, or click  this link to read more about  STAKEHOLDERS FOR WILLOW STREET PARK.

Stakeholders_WSP_Presentation_2016.07.28_Leaflet_half_sheet

Raise Grassroots Participation

Stakeholders for a Safe Green Village (aka Stakeholders SGV) is a community based organization for the purpose to raise grassroots participation!

WE’RE ALL STAKEHOLDERS

Stakeholders SGV aims itself primarily on a basis of stakeholder principles, organizing ad hoc projects, discussions and community orientations. While each stakeholder has its own particular interest in a given project; our ethic is to cultivate everyone towards a shared and all-inclusive vision of the community.  Involved stakeholders can include those of various character: volunteers; public citizens and residents at large; individual or organizational program sponsors; local non-profit organizations; private businesses and trade; socio-cultural affiliations (or communities),  governmental representatives and bodies, etc.  Stakeholders SGV does not affiliate itself with political bodies, however.

Stakeholders SGV’s philosophy is an integral and holistic approach to imagination.  The plurality of stakeholders’ needs are at center of all considerations and decisions, as well as at the start of any action.  The principles that guide considerations are integral and holistic approaches to the disciplines and systems that govern our life: psychological; socio-cultural; natural (ecological and biological); physical (built and technological); economic; etc. etc.  The decision making process is always one of integrity, approaching issues with honesty; a review of all the fundamental principles; a commitment to ethics, standards and justice; as well as, ultimately, finding ways to improve the longevity of life and to live it out with quality.

Stakeholder SGV brings together people,  businesses and other organizations to work on projects and create strategies; that’s while simultaneously gathering and utilizing this collective knowledge and experience for a common process that benefits our community.

RAISE THE STAKES

In any ad hoc project, Stakeholders SGV will seek to

  • Identify, recognize, acknowledge and, ultimately engage the various stakeholders, with an overriding commitment to raise grassroots participation;
  • Determine the quality and quantity of interest by each stockholder, as much as their influence, to ensure a democratic process;
  • Establish a forum and network of communication between stakeholders to develop a shared plan;
  • Assert, define and defend a position or policy, as reflected by our mission, purpose, philosophy and values.

Its our role to empower and inform each and every participatory member via various forms of communication; but also to raise, engage and develop membership from at large.  Whatever an individual stakeholder’s level of ability or interest, there must be accommodations made for various capacities of involvement.  It is the exercise of stakeholders to uphold the purpose and shared ethic of all participants, while also fostering responsible leadership that ensures sustainable growth in a caring, reliable and hopeful manner.

GRASSROOTS

We shall raise a natural and spontaneous involvement within the general community,  differentiating ourselves from traditional power structures, as well as from those other organizations that are controlled by hidden, non-grassroots interest.   The voice of the body should never come off robotic or overly scripted, lacking imagination or individuality.  Our primary interest is to raise the most basic level of an activity or organization,  such as that which is for and by ordinary people.   All stakeholders in the community shall benefit from a square deal, which includes fair and balanced process.  The content of ideas and personal character matters more than the power and privilege of any one individual or stakeholder.  Grassroots membership shall be the primary body of representation.  Stakeholders are cultivated at the local level, including the participation of volunteers from the community.

As grassroots participants, our philosophy is to “think globallyact locally. ”  That is, to not only raise membership locally, but engage projects locally that are in keeping with a big picture worldview.

Where there’s a will there’s a way.”   When dressing any situation or project, a grassroots work ethic is employed that reflects a bootstrapping mentality, such as by accepting given or minimal resources at hand.  We can improve our position by our own efforts, using a “can do” attitude when looking at any scenario.

To raise the grassroots participation, our tactics include:

  • Hosting meetings on an informal basis;
  • Organizing larger gatherings, like town hall meetings and panel discussions, for in-depth analysis, understanding and interest;
  • Putting up posters for public outreach and information;
  • Engaging everyday residents in Main Street environments; as well as visiting door-to-door and face-to-face with inviduals and organizations;
  • Gathering information for projects, as well as signatures for petitions;
  • Writing formal position papers, encouraging letter-writing and emails by membership, plus phone-calls;
  • Sharing information via social media, websites, information booths or tables, etc;
  • Raising money from various stakeholders for project sponsorship and campaigns;
  • Demonstrating issues at large and speaking out;
  • Networking with various stakeholders to cooperate on various projects, ideas and opinions, in turn impacting media and government;
  • Creating engaging activities and projects in which individuals and groups can participate and take action;
  • Using online social networks to organize virtual communities.

PARTICIPATION

For participation to be raised, it is essential that the opinion and influence of individual stakeholders remain democratic, as well as that public process and the nature of activities are transparent.  Fairness fosters greater interest, understanding, support (trust) and motivation to carry forward.  Having equal participation is also essential for critical analysis and successful outcomes.

Participation is representation.  An effort must be made to include powerless “have not” individuals, so as not to regard them instrumentally or as a cause, but empowering them as part of the grassroots to help themselves.

Therefore, the decision making process must be open, accessible and affirming; which is to say, it’s not only representative, but empowering and authoritative.

We invite you to become an active —participatory — stakeholder with the grassroots of our communities.   Six area of main interest are shared from this page and within the website.  Many of these areas cross over with one another, as well as into various other aspects programs, projects and that of life and living.

Join us!  Raise grass-roots participation!

Raise Grassroots Participation

Stakeholders for a Safe Green Village (aka Stakeholders SGV) is a community based organization for the purpose to raise grassroots participation!

WE’RE ALL STAKEHOLDERS

Stakeholders SGV aims itself primarily on a basis of stakeholder principles, organizing ad hoc projects, discussions and community orientations. While each stakeholder has its own particular interest in a given project; our ethic is to cultivate everyone towards a shared and all-inclusive vision of the community.  Involved stakeholders can include those of various character: volunteers; public citizens and residents at large; individual or organizational program sponsors; local non-profit organizations; private businesses and trade; socio-cultural affiliations (or communities),  governmental representatives and bodies, etc.  Stakeholders SGV does not affiliate itself with political bodies, however.

Stakeholders SGV’s philosophy is an integral and holistic approach to imagination.  The plurality of stakeholders’ needs are at center of all considerations and decisions, as well as at the start of any action.  The principles that guide considerations are integral and holistic approaches to the disciplines and systems that govern our life: psychological; socio-cultural; natural (ecological and biological); physical (built and technological); economic; etc. etc.  The decision making process is always one of integrity, approaching issues with honesty; a review of all the fundamental principles; a commitment to ethics, standards and justice; as well as, ultimately, finding ways to improve the longevity of life and to live it out with quality.

Stakeholder SGV brings together people,  businesses and other organizations to work on projects and create strategies; that’s while simultaneously gathering and utilizing this collective knowledge and experience for a common process that benefits our community.

RAISE THE STAKES

In any ad hoc project, Stakeholders SGV will seek to

  • Identify, recognize, acknowledge and, ultimately engage the various stakeholders, with an overriding commitment to raise grassroots participation;
  • Determine the quality and quantity of interest by each stockholder, as much as their influence, to ensure a democratic process;
  • Establish a forum and network of communication between stakeholders to develop a shared plan;
  • Assert, define and defend a position or policy, as reflected by our mission, purpose, philosophy and values.

Its our role to empower and inform each and every participatory member via various forms of communication; but also to raise, engage and develop membership from at large.  Whatever an individual stakeholder’s level of ability or interest, there must be accommodations made for various capacities of involvement.  It is the exercise of stakeholders to uphold the purpose and shared ethic of all participants, while also fostering responsible leadership that ensures sustainable growth in a caring, reliable and hopeful manner.

GRASSROOTS

We shall raise a natural and spontaneous involvement within the general community,  differentiating ourselves from traditional power structures, as well as from those other organizations that are controlled by hidden, non-grassroots interest.   The voice of the body should never come off robotic or overly scripted, lacking imagination or individuality.  Our primary interest is to raise the most basic level of an activity or organization,  such as that which is for and by ordinary people.   All stakeholders in the community shall benefit from a square deal, which includes fair and balanced process.  The content of ideas and personal character matters more than the power and privilege of any one individual or stakeholder.  Grassroots membership shall be the primary body of representation.  Stakeholders are cultivated at the local level, including the participation of volunteers from the community.

As grassroots participants, our philosophy is to “think globallyact locally. ”  That is, to not only raise membership locally, but engage projects locally that are in keeping with a big picture worldview.

Where there’s a will there’s a way.”   When dressing any situation or project, a grassroots work ethic is employed that reflects a bootstrapping mentality, such as by accepting given or minimal resources at hand.  We can improve our position by our own efforts, using a “can do” attitude when looking at any scenario.

To raise the grassroots participation, our tactics include:

  • Hosting meetings on an informal basis;
  • Organizing larger gatherings, like town hall meetings and panel discussions, for in-depth analysis, understanding and interest;
  • Putting up posters for public outreach and information;
  • Engaging everyday residents in Main Street environments; as well as visiting door-to-door and face-to-face with inviduals and organizations;
  • Gathering information for projects, as well as signatures for petitions;
  • Writing formal position papers, encouraging letter-writing and emails by membership, plus phone-calls;
  • Sharing information via social media, websites, information booths or tables, etc;
  • Raising money from various stakeholders for project sponsorship and campaigns;
  • Demonstrating issues at large and speaking out;
  • Networking with various stakeholders to cooperate on various projects, ideas and opinions, in turn impacting media and government;
  • Creating engaging activities and projects in which individuals and groups can participate and take action;
  • Using online social networks to organize virtual communities.

PARTICIPATION

For participation to be raised, it is essential that the opinion and influence of individual stakeholders remain democratic, as well as that public process and the nature of activities are transparent.  Fairness fosters greater interest, understanding, support (trust) and motivation to carry forward.  Having equal participation is also essential for critical analysis and successful outcomes.

Participation is representation.  An effort must be made to include powerless “have not” individuals, so as not to regard them instrumentally or as a cause, but empowering them as part of the grassroots to help themselves.

Therefore, the decision making process must be open, accessible and affirming; which is to say, it’s not only representative, but empowering and authoritative.

We invite you to become an active —participatory — stakeholder with the grassroots of our communities.   Six area of main interest are shared from this page and within the website.  Many of these areas cross over with one another, as well as into various other aspects programs, projects and that of life and living.

Join us!  Raise grass-roots participation!